Lightroom

is anyone else having this problem, or noticing this? I process all of my images through lightroom, and they look "great" and where I need them to be. I will upload them to zenfolio, and then view them on my website (to see how my clients will see them), and through the slideshow. The colors/contrast/lighting is off from how I edited them in lightroom! I'm viewing it all on the same screen that I edited it on. I'm not sure what to do... do I need to re-edit my work? Are my clients going to see the photos with the color/contrast slightly off from how I originally edited?

Best Answers

Answers

  • BeautifulDayBeautifulDay Member Posts: 31
    thank you!!! This is good to know! Just as long as my clients are seeing what I envisioned... :)
    I do have another question, (I didn't want to ask both at once, because I didn't want to confuse the two, these really are separate questions)

    I typically edit in a "dark" room... heavy shades over the windows, lights off. I will edit (in lightroom), come back a day or so later, and the shade/coloring of my photographs (in lightroom) will have changed from what I origanlly edited them at! Does anyone ever have a problem with their screen or graphics program changing on them(not sure which)? I am constantly recalibrating my screen, and making prints, just to make sure the color/contrast is still "on" (although not perfect when it is). It's a nightmare. I recently had to re-edit a shoot for a client as a result of the problem.

    I don't have a top of the line screen for editing, and I know eventually I need a new one (although currently can't afford one), but even so, should it be changing?! I leave my screen on 24/7 so that it is always "warmed up." Do I need a new graphics program?
    I tried using the spyder 3 hardware, and obviously I wasn't doing something right, because the hardware left the coloring so distorted, I had to go back to using the computer's software graphic/coloring program.

    Any advice would be appreciated. :)
  • alejandroceppiphotographyalejandroceppiphotography Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMember Posts: 38
    edited September 2013
    Remember that if you are working and saving as Adobe RGB, your clients will not be seeing the photos as you envisioned them. Different is if you work or save as sRGB but have your monitor calibrated in order to work seeing the colors as they should be and have assigned to your graphic card and/or system (I am not quite sure how this works technically) a personalized ICC profile (not to the files / images).

    Regarding what you are mentioning now, you are right, I also think it is a real nightmare.

    I am calibrating my monitor using x-rite´s i1 Pro, but calibrating a monitor thinking on printing is not exactly the same (for me) as when you are concerned on how will your photos be seen by others on your web site.

    Most people don´t calibrate their monitors, not all monitors show the same brightness or the same contrast and people might be looking at your photos during the day or at night. Not all monitors (especially if not calibrated) will be showing the full gray scale (what you see as a dark grey, others might be seeing as a deep black). And most people looking at your photos will not have “…….a top of the line screen for editing”. It is a real nightmare when you think about it.

    In spite of having my monitor calibrated, what I do (and I am not saying it is working) is to verify how my images look under different conditions. If I work during the day (I also do that) I check how an image looks watching at it in the monitor at night, ….and the opposite. In both situations I look at the screen at its level, I stand up, go to the left and/or right, etc.. (I mean, I check how the image looks when seen at different angles from the screen). Then, I check how the image looks on my netbook (different PC and different screen altogether). When I think the image looks as an average showable no matter what (not perfect but at least OK in any situation I tested), then I am happy. I am assuming that doing what I described, I might be getting a kind of average of everything by which most people might be seeing my images as an acceptable and showable result under most normal conditions.

    I have not read about doing this anywhere (although maybe I am not the only one who does this and somebody already wrote about it) and on the contrary, it seems to be the opposite of what is usually recommended. So maybe it is a crazy thing to do, but apart from profiting from what others write and have to teach about everything concerning photography (I read a lot about the subject), hopping I am not sinning by being stubborn, I also sometimes apply my own thinking and adopt my own ways (until proved I am wrong).
    Post edited by alejandroceppiphotography on
  • BeautifulDayBeautifulDay Member Posts: 31
    that is a good idea, looking for an average, I do have multiple computers I can try it on, as well. I do everything in standard RGB, vrs adobe, just because I want to get it closer to what the final image my clients will see.
    Where would I go to look for/buy a calibrating program? I do have the spyer 3 hardware, but have had no luck with that. Would a software work better? The only thing I use currently is the computer's program called "NVIDIA" and then also just plucking away at the external controls next to the power button. I still don't feel like something's right.
  • alejandroceppiphotographyalejandroceppiphotography Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMember Posts: 38
    edited September 2013
    I am using i1 (eye one) display pro form x-rite and I am happy with it. It has a colorimeter and the software that goes with it.

    Maybe someone who has spyer 3 can give you some advice and or tips on how to get the best and most from it.

    I used to try to calibrate my monitor fiddling with the sliders that control the RGB channel curves (the sliders that show when using the programs that come with most graphic cards and which are probably similar to what you are using now), but I was never sure if I was getting the colors right, trying to get things right always took me a lot of time and every parameter you modify affects the colors for which the other two intervene so it is a lot of work. So I decide to make an investment and buy a colorimeter which I thought was going to be more trustable than what my eyes were seeing and than what I could be perceiving (which might be affected and influenced by too many variables). Now, I do my calibration (the devise and software does it) while watching TV.
  • BeautifulDayBeautifulDay Member Posts: 31
    Thank you! If it works, I will buy it... I was just so disappointed with the spyder3 version, (the colors were so off when it was "calibrated" that I had to turn off the program and stop using it)
    Is the program you're using fairly easy to use? Is this what you are speaking of: http://www.amazon.com/X-Rite-i1Display-Calibrator-Displays-Version/dp/B000JLO31M/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1378937254&sr=8-3&keywords=I1
    ? I really need a breakthrough on this, I appreciate the help!
  • alejandroceppiphotographyalejandroceppiphotography Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMember Posts: 38
    edited September 2013
    The one you pointed at, seems to be an old version. I have this one

    Yes, it is very easy to use once you managed to do your first calibration right, but I needed to read some tutorials and FAQ about the product before being able to get the first one right (and there is a thing with Windows 7 that ought to be worked around). Among other things, the first time you calibrate the monitor, you have to set it up to its default settings and cancel (from then on) any automatic adjustments (as for example could be an automatic enhancement of contrast that some monitors allow). It worked better for me to set the luminance to 90 instead of 120 as recommended (but whatever you do, if it does not work, you can modify improving the results by calibrating the monitor again, changing whichever parameter might not be working as it should).

    Remember that the purpose for calibrating the monitor is not to enhance how the images will look on your screen, but to allow you to see them as they really are according to the data that define them. For example, a R128, G128, B128 should look as a neutral grey and a R254, G254, B254 should look as a neutral white, not as a nice warm white nor as cold one if you like cold.
    Post edited by alejandroceppiphotography on
  • BeautifulDayBeautifulDay Member Posts: 31
    that sounds pretty simple! Thank you!! I don't need to enhance my images, I just need them to have accurate color/contrast when I DO edit them. My prints aren't matching what I THINK I'm editing, and it's exhausting editing over and over again, and still not knowing if it's exactly right. I have 2 shoots I need to redo, now, because something is up with the screen.
    I just calibrated my screen last night (again), by switching the RGB sliders back and forth...Everything looked great after I calibrated, and today, I come home, and the colors are off.. again. I'm starting to think it's doing something on it's own... almost creepy, in a way... Ever heard of this happening to anyone??
  • BeautifulDayBeautifulDay Member Posts: 31
    I just ran into another problem I haven't noticed before... Photos in lightroom are showing up way/over saturated! On all of my other screens/programs, photos come out "normal" but I can't figure out why lightroom is so overly saturated? Is there a setting I'm missing?
  • Stroodle88Stroodle88 White Salmon, WAMember Posts: 90
    @BeautifulDay: Question for you re: Lightroom and images oversaturated ~ what format are you importing images into Lightroom in? RAW? JPG?
    Bertrand Hui
    Bertrand Hui - Lifestyle Photographer
    Based in the Columbia River Gorge, Pacific Northwest
  • jimswinjimswin Member Posts: 1

    thank you!!! This is good to know! Just as long as my clients are seeing what I envisioned... :)
    I do have another question, (I didn't want to ask both at once, because I didn't want to confuse the two, these really are separate questions)

    I typically edit in a "dark" room... heavy shades over the windows, lights off. I will edit (in lightroom), come back a day or so later, and the shade/coloring of my photographs (in lightroom) will have changed from what I origanlly edited them at! Does anyone ever have a problem with their screen or graphics program changing on them(not sure which)? I am constantly recalibrating my screen, and making prints, just to make sure the color/contrast is still "on" (although not perfect when it is). It's a nightmare. I recently had to re-edit a shoot for a client as a result of the problem.

    I don't have a top of the line screen for editing, and I know eventually I need a new one (although currently can't afford one), but even so, should it be changing?! I leave my screen on 24/7 so that it is always "warmed up." Do I need a new graphics program?
    I tried using the spyder 3 hardware, and obviously I wasn't doing something right, because the hardware left the coloring so distorted, I had to go back to using the computer's software graphic/coloring program.

    Any advice would be appreciated. :)

    Hi I know it has been a while since you posted this but just in case you have not fixed the issue I thought maybe I can help. I use to also edit in the dark and found my prints not matching and noticed the color shift issue you are referring to. I won't go into a lot of technical stuff because I'm in no way an expert but I can tell you how I fixed my issue by doing weeks of research on the web and now my prints match perfectly with my screen in color, brightness and contrast.

    First off your eyes are the issue. Your eyes adjust to make white, white almost like a auto white balance in a camera. Don't take my word for it. Set your monitor to where the whites are warm and yellowish in color and then sit in the dark and in a few minutes the yellowish whites will look white again. Leave the room for 5 minutes and come back and they will be yellow again. Your eye basically adjusts to lighting conditions to show you white and this is what is happening and it shifts all color off in the process.

    Now I will let you know what I did to fix the issue.

    First do not edit in the dark. That make the color change issue even worse. Block out the outside light and get you a color accurate bulb for your room that matched the k or is close to the k you are editing at ex 56k, 60k 65k. Only make the light in the room to where it is comfortable in brightness, not to bright and not to dark. I got mine about the same brightness you would find most offices to be at.

    Pick a prefered professional printer and calibrate your monitor for that printer. All professional printers will let you know their standards and they all very. I use Nations Photo Lab and they calibrate their monitors with a x-rite i1 Pro to 60k so that's what I bought and I calibrated my monitor to 60K. They also print at 60k and their labs have color balanced lights at 60k.

    Set your brightness to 100 cdm when calibrating. This depends on the brightness of your room but if you have lighting close to what you would find in a normal office environment, this should be okay.

    Edit pictures for no more than 10-15 minutes and then take a minute or two brake looking away from the monitor. This helps your eyes get a reality check and can help but some people are more prone to color shift than others. My wife can almost never look away and everything matches but with me I notice the shift within 5 minutes of editing and have to be very careful. I know it's a pain but if it keeps you from having to re edit your pictures it's worth it.

    Your monitor does needs to be decent. You will get the elitist that will say you have to have a professional grade monitor costing 1k plus and you will never get professional results unless you do. Wrong.. They will also tell you, you can't use an iMac to edit but that's what I use and it calibrates to 100% srgb and 80% rgb and looks and works fine. Professional printers like Nations Photos Lab require your photos color space to be srgb anyway or they will convert it to that so what you see on your screen is what you will get from them. I know there is probably a lot I don't understand about color space and why 100 % rgb is better all I know is my iMac monitor after calibration looks good and my prints look amazing even when printed at sizes over 30 inches. Now again you do need a decent monitor. I had a HP when I first started that I thought was pretty good but even after calibration never came close to matching prints. It was time for a computer upgrade so I took my chances on a late 2013 27" iMac maxed out hoping the monitor would calibrate well and I have never been happier.

    Also check your editing as you go, use the compare feature in Lightroom. Bring up the last couple of photos you edited to compare to the one you just finished and see if they match. In wedding photography (for me) it is important that all photos are color graded the same and look as if they are all part of a set and bringing up several at the same time can definitely keep you on the right track.

    That's pretty much it, following this gives me perfect printed pictures from my professional print lab every time and it's been almost a year with no issues. Don't expect your pictures to match on every monitor because most are not calibrated and way too bright. For me having my clients prints match my monitor and looking the way I intended them to is more important to me.

    Anyhow, hope this helps. If it was a hardware or software issue and you got it figured out and fixed then thats great and what matters most.

    Take care
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